A Lecture on Ethics, 17th November 1929

“[…] That is to say:  I see now that these nonsensical expressions were not nonsensical because I had not yet found the correction expressions, but that their nonsensicality was their very essence.  For all I wanted to do with them was just to go beyond the world and that is to say beyond significant language.  My whole tendency and I believe the tendency of all men who ever tried to write or talk Ethics or Religion was to run against the boundaries of language.  This running against the walls of our cage is perfectly, absolutely hopeless.  Ethics, so far as it springs from the desire to say something about the ultimate meaning of life, the absolute good, the absolute valuable, can be no science.  What is says does not add to our knowledge in any sense.  But it is a document of a tendency in the human mind which I personally cannot help respecting dearly and I would not for my life ridicule it.”

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